Sleeping & Breathing Misses in the Black Community | Karese LaGuerre

Karese LaGuerre | Sleeping & Breathing Misses in the Black Community

Having trouble sleeping?

Karese LaGuerre is the author of “Accomplished: How to Sleep Better, Eliminate Burnout and Execute Goals.” She’s a Registered Dental Hygienist and Myofunctional Therapist. She founded The Myo Spot, a practice aimed at amplifying oral wellness to whole body wellness. In this episode Karese and I talk about her work, the little things regarding sleep we don’t think about and how the Black community gets left behind in the conversation.

Karese LaGuerre | Sleeping & Breathing Misses in the Black Community
Karese LaGuerre | Sleeping & Breathing Misses in the Black Community

You can find Karese and The Myo Spot online:

Buy her book “Accomplished: How to Sleep Better, Eliminate Burnout and Execute Goals.”


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Come dish with us in the Dishing on Diversity Facebook Group where we can also answer your diversity, equity and inclusion questions!

On Instagram follow Diversity Dish and Sedruola 

Show your support for this community by joining us

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Transcript

Speaker 1 (00:00):

Power elevation experience registration is coming up. It starts on March 24th and it ends on March 31st. What’s the power elevation experience. It’s about music, movement, education, and action. We’re talking diversity, equity and inclusion by learning, and then taking action in different ways in our everyday lives. What we’re doing with the music is getting empowered and we’re moving our bodies so that our minds are ready to receive the information. If you want to learn more, the link will be down in the show notes. In this episode, we’ll be talking to Karese LaGuerre, welcome to diversity dish, where we’re dishing on everything. Diversity, equity, inclusion, and justice related. My name is Sedruola Maruska, and we’re bridging the gap between what needs to be said and what needs to be heard. Those individual experiences that are often ignored or simply dismissed. Sometimes I’m dining alone. Sometimes I’m dining with friends and sometimes I’m dining a-la-cart, no matter how I’m dining, it promises to be delicious. Let’s dig in

Karese LaGuerre is a registered dental hygienist and myofunctional therapist. She founded the Myo spot practice aimed at amplifying oral wellness to whole body wellness through teletherapy. She helps clients of all ages overcome tongue ties, TMJ disorders, sleep apnea, grinding anxiety, and various breathing and oral facial dysfunction, passionate about education. And self-help she published, accomplished how to sleep better, eliminate burnout and execute goals. When she’s not working with clients globally, she spends time with her husband and four kids.

Speaker 2 (02:05):

Hey Karese, thank you so much for being here. It is such a pleasure to meet you. I am so happy to be here. Thank you for having me. Absolutely. It’s my pleasure. So as we get into our discussion, I like to start off just a little light and personal before we get into the deep information that we will get into. But I would like to know what is it that you’re passionate about right now? I am super passionate about awareness of the importance of sleep and even more so the importance of good breathing to help impact that sleep and make it more purposeful where need that sleep to re-energize, you know, get ourselves back to full a hundred percent. We’re charging up at night that way, the next day we’re good to go. So I am a hundred percent passionate about that sleep and are essential.

Unapologetic Black Woman – Takirra Winfield Dixon

Takirra Winfield Dixon | Unapologetic Black Woman

“It’s so important for Black women to own or own tables.” – Takirra Winfield Dixon

That’s just one of the many gems that Takirra dropped in this episode. Takirra is an unapologetic Black woman whose mission is to help other Black women be the same. In this conversation we talk about what it means to be an unapologetic Black woman and why it’s so important for Black women to build their own tables. We also talk about hair, Black spaces and why showing up is so important. We had a great conversation that I think you’ll learn from and enjoy.

Folks are too comfortable thanking us instead of respecting us. - Quote by Takirra Winfield Dixon

Here are the many ways you can learn more about Takirra Winfield Dixon and how you can work with her to help formulate your own voice.

The Grio article:

“Honestie Hodges and the intersectional systemic racism of Black women and girls” – https://thegrio.com/2021/03/16/intersectional-racism-black-women-girls/

Salon Articles:

“Does this smart watch come with an app to deal with casual racism”

“My college’s response to a Nazi march taught me about the “true America” 

“I’m a Black woman, not a “woman of color.” Here’s why I make that distinction”


Power Elevation Experience registration is NOW OPEN!


Enjoyed this episode? Don’t forget to  Review for a chance to be Shouted Out in a future episode. . . also Download, Rate & Share to help more people find this podcast.


Come dish with us in the Dishing on Diversity Facebook Group where we can also answer your diversity, equity and inclusion questions!

On Instagram follow Diversity Dish and Sedruola 

Show your support for this community by joining us


Learn how you can work with Sedruola

Transcript

Speaker 1 (00:00:00):

Are you having trouble sleeping, maybe you’re snoring, or maybe you just don’t feel rested in the morning and you feel like your body still needs a little bit more. Well, if that’s the case, then you should take a listen to our last episode with Currys, like air, where she talked to us about the reasons why we may not be sleeping as well, and especially how that may be affecting the black community. But before you do that, let’s take a listen to this episode with tequila, Winfield, Dixon,

Speaker 2 (00:00:40):

Welcome to diversity dish where we’re dishing on everything. Diversity, equity, inclusion, and justice related. My name is central and Mariska, and we’re bridging the gap between what needs to be said and what needs to be heard. Those individual experiences that are often ignored or simply dismissed. Sometimes I’m dining alone. Sometimes I’m dining with friends and sometimes I’m dining. I Lockhart, no matter how I’m dining, it promises to be delicious. Let’s dig in

Speaker 1 (00:01:22):

Kira Windfield Dickson served as a political appointee in president Barack Obama’s administration. She’s currently the strategic advisor to president Obama’s U S secretary of education. John B. King Jr. To cure also served for six years as a senior member of Martin O’Malley’s gubernatorial administration. She’s a proud Howard alum, a graduate of the university of Maryland and has experienced as a communications consultant Takirra has dedicated her career to elevating and uplifting stories and the experiences of black women. Oh my goodness. Takirra, I cannot tell you how excited I am to have you on diversity dish. I’m flattered. Oh my goodness. Thank you so much for coming on. I will tell you that I didn’t even know who you were. I don’t think until like the day I sent you a message and said, will you please be on me?

(see pages below to read more)

Your policies suck, that’s why we have a problem

Your policies suck, that's why we have this problem | Sedruola Maruska

We moved a lot when we were young. My immigrant father was focused on getting an education, and providing for his family. So, wherever the opportunities were, that’s where we went.

Which is why in the summer of 1977 we moved to Salt Lake City, Utah. My dad was accepted into the University of Utah’s doctorate program so we moved into family student housing. I was 9 years old.

When my brother and I started school we were the only two Black children in a school of over 200 students. We stood out at a time when I didn’t want to stand out.

Salt Lake City

During our time in Salt Lake City I remember wondering a lot about the way I looked. I asked my mom why I couldn’t wear my hair down instead of in braids. I’d stand in front of the bathroom mirror and pull up my nose to be more “pointy” like my friends. At nine years old we’re formulating our perceptions of ourselves. We’re figuring out where we fit in the world and I didn’t fit.

One day (and this is relayed to me by a friend I found on Facebook years later) while in class a boy was teasing me about my color. He started talking about how I looked like poop, laughing and carrying on. As I’m enduring this abuse, I begin to cry and complain. Instead of the boy being disciplined, the teacher told me “If you can’t stop disrupting class, you’ll need to go out in the hall.” I’m nine years old and I have to control my reaction to the abuse being inflicted on me by a white child.

I was sent to the hall.

Personally, I don’t remember that moment. I remember others with the same theme. I’m the problem so I need to suck it up. Endure what’s happening. Be strong. Be the bigger person, the better person. While those who are inflicting the pain, go unpunished. Because they’re white and so therefore they must be right.

Your policies suck, that's why we have this problem | Sedruola Maruska

Ignoring The Signs

As I look around the country right now, I’m reminded of that ignorance. We watched as armed white people storm the capital building with no repercussion. We watched as police officers looked the other way to allow these terrorists to cross barricades, take selfies with the perpetrators and claim overwhelm, while the lawmakers inside had to cower for their lives.

All over social media parallels are being drawn on the different responses to acts of terrorism when the perpetrators are white vs. when people of color and Black people are protesting policies that threaten their lives.

Just like in my fourth grade classroom where I became the problem and I was disciplined, Black and Brown people are always dealt with harsher than white people. Here’s the kicker, it happens all across the country in every discipline and industry.

It starts with students and goes through the workforce. It’s easier to punish the victims than it is to confront a system that benefits you and demand that system change.

White terrorism

What’s the consequence? The consequence is white terrorists running around the country killing with impunity and being treated as human. While those they are terrorizing are treated like the problem.

White people are allowed to do as they please when they have a “bad day” while the rest of us must swallow our pain.

White people are allowed to have mental health issues while the rest of us are “too sensitive” or “genetically prone to violence.”

White people are allowed to be angry, protest, lash out maim and kill while their vegan, vacation and huger needs are taken care of. The rest of us better be happy we didn’t die at the scene.

The consequence, as I wrote in this article is a country where everything and everyone suffers because of tolerance rather than justice. We, all of us, are left reeling and wondering what’s the next logical step to take? What part can we play in creating change?

Proof in Policy

Companies are creating products to placate when we know it’s changes in their policies that create real change. Yes, we appreciate removing “Aunt Jemima” from your products, but what does your C-Suite look like? Thanks for putting out that statement, but are your employees of color comfortable in your culture?

Corporations have the power to push governments to make real policy changes needed to move the needle. Yet, in Georgia, and across the country, where these giants with power are headquartered, voter suppression laws are running rampant. The wording is more nuanced and vague, but we know, we ALL know they’re intentionally directed at people of color, especially Black people.

It’s time to stop pretending we don’t know what do to, and do what we do know. Do the hard things. Corporations are made up of people. Those people need to stop hiding and do better. Say NO. Look to the future and make the hard decisions in the present. Invest in your people, your policies and revamping your cultures.

We the people appreciate the surface stuff, but we’d all, including yourselves, be better served with real policy changes and more bravery.